A Testament of Hope: The Essential Writings and Speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr. Review

Overall Rating (based on customer reviews): 4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5 stars

A Testament of Hope: The Essential Writings and Speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr.

The specs of ‘A Testament of Hope: The Essential Writings and Speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr.’ are:

  • Publisher: HarperOne (2003-04-29)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060646918
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2x6x2.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds

Here are some REAL customer reviews:

“An important collection of writings”

” edited by James M. Washington, is an impressive volume. This book brings together essays, speeches, sermons, interviews, and excerpts from King's books… Read more

“Essential reading for human rights advocates”

I learned more about Dr. King and his philosophies by reading his actual words than I could have learned reading a history or biography. I was surprised to learn that Dr King's journey was a long one even before civil rights movement, that he studied… Read more

“An Indispensible Collection”

A Testament of Hope is indispensible for a complete understanding of MLK Jr. the man. He was so much more than a monolithic figure of the Civil Rights movement. He was a pastor, theologian, philosopher, diplomat, husband, and father. A Testament of Hope… Read more

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Martin Luther King - But if Not - FULL SERMON

A sermon given by Martin Luther King, Jr. at the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta on November 5, 1967. The title, "But if Not", comes from Daniel chapter 3, verse 18 in the story of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego.

Audio is from the Internet Archive: http://www.archive.org/details/MlkButIfNot
Picture is from the Library of Congress via wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Martin_Luther_King_Jr_NYWTS.jpg

Full transcription available on my blog: http://notoriousbiggins.blogspot.com/2010/01/but-if-not-sermon-by-martin-luther-king.html

One great quote:
I want to say to you this morning, my friends, that somewhere along the way you should discover something that's so dear, so precious to you, that is so eternally worthful, that you will never give it up. You ought to discover some principle, you ought to have some great faith that grips you so much that you will never give it up. Somehow you go on and say "I know that the God that I worship is able to deliver me, but if not, I'm going on anyhow, I'm going to stand up for it anyway." What does this mean? It means, in the final analysis, you do right not to avoid hell. If you're doing right merely to keep from going to something that traditional theology has called hell then you aren't doing right. If you do right merely to go to a condition that theologians have called heaven, you aren't doing right. If you are doing right to avoid pain and to achieve happiness and pleasure then you aren't doing right. Ultimately you must do right because it's right to do right. And you got to say "But if not." You must love ultimately because it's lovely to love. You must be just because it's right to be just. You must be honest because it's right to be honest. This is what this text is saying more than anything else. And finally, you must do it because it has gripped you so much that you are willing to die for it if necessary. And I say to you this morning, that if you have never found something so dear and so precious to you that you will die for it, then you aren't fit to live. You may be 38 years old as I happen to be, and one day some great opportunity stands before you and calls upon you to stand up for some great principle, some great issue, some great cause--and you refuse to do it because you are afraid; you refuse to do it because you want to live longer; you're afraid that you will lose your job, or you're afraid that you will be criticized or that you will lose your popularity or you're afraid that somebody will stab you or shoot at you or bomb your house, and so you refuse to take the stand. Well you may go on and live until you are 90, but you're just as dead at 38 as you would be at 90! And the cessation of breathing in your life is but the belated announcement of an earlier death of the spirit. You died when you refused to stand up for right, you died when you refused to stand up for truth, you died when you refused to stand up for justice.

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